The research station lies in central Norway, at the heart of Norwegian salmon production. Photo: Kjell Merok/Nofima
The research station lies in central Norway, at the heart of Norwegian salmon production. Photo: Kjell Merok/Nofima

Research Station for Sustainable Aquaculture

At this land-based research station at Sunndalsøra with fresh water, seawater and recirculated water, we can carry out biological and technological experiments along the complete aquaculture value chain.

Contact person
Portrettbilde av Synnøve Helland
Synnøve Helland

Manager, Research Station
Phone: +47 934 18 912
synnove.helland@nofima.no

We offer:
  • Experiments in facilities with and without water recirculation, in fresh water, seawater and brackish water
  • Testing of feed and raw materials
  • Research into the determinants of robustness in farmed fish, using swimming tunnels and respiration chambers
  • Radiography to investigate the development of deformities
  • Storage and testing of genetic material

The research station lies in central Norway, at the heart of Norwegian salmon production. Diversity is the station’s forte – many tools for particular problems have been developed at the station during the past 40 years and more.

The station has research facilities for nutrition, formulated feeds, physiology, breeding, recirculation, radiography and metabolism studies. The station also has its own laboratory.

The principal activity is research in the following fields:

  • Nutrition, feed and feeding
  • Breeding and genetics
  • New species
  • Quality
  • Preventative health measures
  • Production technology and the environment

The Nofima Centre for Recirculation in Aquaculture (NCRA) is also located at the research station. This centre was built in 2010 and is suitable for testing technology and studying farmed fish in the aquaculture systems of the future.

Research is currently carried out in six halls with a total floor area of 6,500 m2. The centre has 22 biocontainment departments with just over 1,000 tanks, and 600 hatcheries of various sizes. The main areas of research at the station concentrate on salmon, and it has licences to work also with cod, wrasse and lumpfish. The water temperature is controlled with heat pumps and district heating.

The research station was built in 1971, and was the first aquaculture research station in Norway. Today, approximately 40 Nofima employees work there.

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