Multifactorial diseases

The goal is a spotless and healthy salmon Disease in salmon is caused by a number of factors in combination, including many micro-organisms, various environmental influences, aquaculture conditions and incorrect nourishment. If one is ignorant of the factors which contribute to the development of diseases and their relative importance, it is difficult either to prevent them or treat them.

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Portrettbilde av Lill Heidi Johansen
The goal is a spotless and healthy salmon
The goal is a spotless and healthy salmon

Disease in salmon is caused by a number of factors in combination, including many micro-organisms, various environmental influences, aquaculture conditions and incorrect nourishment. If one is ignorant of the factors which contribute to the development of diseases and their relative importance, it is difficult either to prevent them or treat them.

Facts

IPN (Infectious pancreatic necrosis)

HSMI (Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation)

CMS (Cardiomyopathy syndrome)

PGI (Proliferative gill inflammation)

There are many examples of multifactorial diseases. By way of this project, scientists at Nofima together with Aqua Gen AS and the Norwegian Veterinary Institute are seeking to boost knowledge of the development of combination diseases of this kind, assess the affects of a number of variablesand find possible correlations between the various factors.

IPN, HSMI, CMS and PGI

These are some of the diseases which are today causing problems for the salmon industry. At national level, IPN is the disease for which the greatest numbers of annual outbreaks are reported. Field data from Troms and Finnmark among others, shows that each year IPN is shown in more than half of all aquaculture facilities. Several of the other diseases often follow in the wake of IPN. Reports have been received from many regions that HSMI in particular occurs after an IPN outbreak, and this disease is also thought to be stress-related.

“We hope to be able to identify the effect of such aspects as genetic resistance (so-called QTL fish), IPN virus carrier status, vaccination and environmentally-related factors, initially concentrating on HSMI. Laboratory trials with IPN virus carrier fish and with subsequent HSMI infection will be followed up by a large scale field study, which will include epidemiological analyses. The results of laboratory trials and the field study will together give the industry an idea of the options for the easier evaluation of health conditions for farmed fish. Salmon producers will then be able to prevent and treat outbreaks of disease more effectively,” says researcher and project manager, Lill-Heidi Johansen.

The project which commenced on 1 September this year will run for three years and is being financed by the Norwegian Fishery and Aquaculture Industry Research Fund (FHF).

Fish health  

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